Your Cookies Might Need A Bit More Flour Than The Recipe Says - The Daily Meal (2024)

Your Cookies Might Need A Bit More Flour Than The Recipe Says - The Daily Meal (2)

Your Cookies Might Need A Bit More Flour Than The Recipe Says - The Daily Meal (3)

Your Cookies Might Need A Bit More Flour Than The Recipe Says

Your Cookies Might Need A Bit More Flour Than The Recipe Says - The Daily Meal (4)

Tanya Consaul Photography/Shutterstock

ByKalea Martin|

You may have heard of measuring with your heart, but while this is an approach that works perfectly fine when adding garlic to pasta, or chocolate chips to pancakes, it doesn't always bode well with every ingredient. When it comes to cookies, for example, the ratio of butter, sugar, eggs, and flour directly influences the texture and taste of the delicious treat. And if you stray from what the recipe calls for — especially if it involves flour — you could end up with a very different result.

According to Land O'Lakes, flour is responsible for one of the main chemical reactions that occur when a cookie comes together. It forms a network of gluten strands that traps the gasses produced by the baking soda. While the protein in the gluten is what gives cookies their texture, the network it forms is what allows cookies to effectively rise. When you alter the amount of flour in a recipe, therefore, you change how soft or tough the cookies turn out.

What happens when you add extra flour to cookie dough

Your Cookies Might Need A Bit More Flour Than The Recipe Says - The Daily Meal (5)

Candice Bell/Shutterstock

If your cookies are coming out looking flatter than you'd like, a little extra flour goes a long way. As Baking Kneads explains, flour not only prevents cookies from spreading too much, but it also gives them height. That's because, in addition to forming a gluten web that allows the baking soda to do its job, flour itself is also a leavening agent. Even if your cookies aren't turning out flat, however, more flour can still be beneficial.

Per Food & Wine, the more flour you use, the denser the consistency will be. Instead of a cookie that is soft or bread-like, you'll end up with one that is firm yet tender and chewy, similar to that of a brownie. If that's the type of texture you want your cookies to have, you'll simply need to be a bit more generous with the flour next time you make a batch.

How much extra flour should you add to cookie dough

Your Cookies Might Need A Bit More Flour Than The Recipe Says - The Daily Meal (6)

Pixel-Shot/Shutterstock

Of course, on the other hand, extra flour in cookies won't yield better results if you go overboard, so it's important to only add what you need. Though flour creates the gluten essential in providing structure to cookies, too much of it can quickly make your baked goods from perfectly dense to hard as a rock, Land O'Lakes points out.

For the best results, Baking Kneads recommends adding one to two tablespoons at a time, or a quarter cup for every two cups of flour (via Food & Wine). If you're not sure how much or how little your recipe needs, Sugar Kissed suggests using the tackiness of the dough as an indicator. When it's still tacky but not sticky, you'll want to stop adding flour.

Add flour beyond this point and your cookie won't cook properly. In addition to having a much tougher texture, Baking is a Science shares that because flour prevents spreading, the bottom will burn before the middle has a chance to fully cook through. But as long as you add the flour little by little and pay attention to the consistency of the dough, it's an easy way to upgrade your cookies.

Recommended

Your Cookies Might Need A Bit More Flour Than The Recipe Says - The Daily Meal (2024)

FAQs

What happens if you add too little flour to cookies? ›

Adding too little flour can cause cookies to be flat, greasy, and crispy. Most recipes assume you'll use all-purpose, but if you want a lighter, crumblier cookie texture, choose one with a lower protein content such as cake-and-pastry flour. Baking soda helps cookies spread outward and upward while cooking.

What does adding more flour do to a cookie? ›

Even if your cookies aren't turning out flat, however, more flour can still be beneficial. Per Food & Wine, the more flour you use, the denser the consistency will be. Instead of a cookie that is soft or bread-like, you'll end up with one that is firm yet tender and chewy, similar to that of a brownie.

How to fix cookies that have too much flour? ›

Another way to fix the problem is to add in a bit of extra liquid, such as milk or water, which will help get the dough back to the consistency it needs to be. Either of these options will work just as well, but make sure to only pick one.

Why is flour important in cookies? ›

Flour lends structure to baked goods, like cakes, biscuits, pastry and bread, with a range in protein content to suit the purpose and desired outcome. Higher-protein flours provide a greater proportion of gluten and a stronger dough for products like bread and the reverse is true for use in cakes and biscuits.

What happens if you use too much flour in a recipe? ›

recipes to be dry or dense! Here's the proper way to. measure flour for your recipes!

What to do if you don't have enough flour? ›

11 best flour substitutions
  1. Chickpea flour. Often confused with besan (see below), chickpea flour is made from ground white chickpeas. ...
  2. Almond flour. Almond flour is an excellent alternative to have in your kitchen cupboard. ...
  3. Gluten-free flour mixture. ...
  4. Coconut flour. ...
  5. Gram flour (besan) ...
  6. Rice flour. ...
  7. Buckwheat flour. ...
  8. Oat flour.
Jan 31, 2023

Does too much flour make cookies flat? ›

I always recommend using a kitchen scale to measure your baking ingredients, especially your flour. Because too little flour and your cookie will spread – too much flour and your cookies will stay as balls in the oven.

What is the best flour for baking cookies? ›

All-Purpose Flour: The Versatile Choice

This balanced protein level makes it versatile enough to produce both soft and chewy cookies as well as slightly crisp ones. If you're looking for a safe bet or are new to cookie baking, all-purpose flour is your go-to option.

What happens if you overmix cookie dough? ›

If you overmix, you will end up aerating (adding air to) the dough, which causes the cookies to rise and then fall, leaving you with flat cookies.

Why do all my cookies taste like flour? ›

Improper flour measurement is the #1 cause of your cookie dough being too dry or the cookies tasting like flour.

What do overmixed cookies taste like? ›

Overmixing your batter can lead to runny cookies.

I mixed the batter more than I should have both during the creaming stage of the recipe and after adding the flour. As a result, the cookies came out light and airy, and I was able to taste the butter more prominently in this batch than in others.

What happens to cookies with old flour? ›

Expired flour won't have the same quality in flavor and texture, so your recipe won't turn out the same. When it comes to self-rising flour, which contains baking powder, expired flour will create baked goods that don't rise. If you feel bad throwing away expired flour, toss it into the compost bin.

What flour do professional bakers use? ›

While bread flour is more than adequate for everyday breads, some professional bakers use high-gluten flour with a 14% protein content to provide extra strength to dense, chewy doughs like bagels and pizza dough. High-gluten bread flour gives milk bread it's taut structure and compact (but tender) crumb.

Is it better to have more or less flour in cookies? ›

Since flour provides the bulk of the structure in a cookie, the amount you use can alter the texture of the cookie: less flour to butter ratio means thin spread out cookies; more flour to butter ratio means dense and doughy cookies that don't spread as much.

What happens if you use plain flour for cookies? ›

What happens if you use plain flour instead of self-raising flour? The difference between plain flour and self-rising flour is that plain flour has no leavening like baking powder. So if you bake with it, your baked foods will not rise. You can use plain flour for things like flatbreads, crepes.

What happens if you put too little baking powder in cookies? ›

If that supply cuts off before the cookies set, a soft dough will collapse in on itself. If it continues until the end, the air pockets are preserved as the cookie's crumb. Baking powder simply adds carbon dioxide to the equation, providing a more forceful pressure that encourages a dough to spread up and out.

What causes a cookie to be too dry? ›

Overmixing the dough

If you overmix the dough, the cookies will be dry and crumbly. The best way to fix this is to add more liquid to the dough. This can be done by adding milk, water, or even melted butter. You may also need to add more flour to the dough if it is too wet.

Why are my cookies so flat and thin? ›

If your cookies consistently come out flat, you may have selected the wrong baking temperature. If you bake cookies using too much heat, the fats in the dough begin to melt before the other ingredients can cook together and form your cookie's rise.

Why did my cookies come out puffy? ›

A spread with less fat, diet "margarines" or spreads in tubs contain have too much water. The water creates steam, causing the cookies to puff. Low protein flours, such as cake flour, absorb less water, leaving excess water to create steam, which causes the cookies to puff.

Top Articles
Latest Posts
Article information

Author: Kelle Weber

Last Updated:

Views: 5841

Rating: 4.2 / 5 (73 voted)

Reviews: 80% of readers found this page helpful

Author information

Name: Kelle Weber

Birthday: 2000-08-05

Address: 6796 Juan Square, Markfort, MN 58988

Phone: +8215934114615

Job: Hospitality Director

Hobby: tabletop games, Foreign language learning, Leather crafting, Horseback riding, Swimming, Knapping, Handball

Introduction: My name is Kelle Weber, I am a magnificent, enchanting, fair, joyous, light, determined, joyous person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.